<div dir="ltr">Dear Mr. Balint<br>Thank you for your information. I will consult further if i have any other questions on the Rp part. <br><br><br><br><br>                                                          With Best Regards <br>                    Peter                                                            <br><br><br></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">2017-03-24 11:38 GMT+08:00 Bálint Aradi <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:aradi@uni-bremen.de" target="_blank">aradi@uni-bremen.de</a>></span>:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">Dear Peter,<br>
<span class=""><br>
> Thank you for your kind reply. You have mention that the repulsive<br>
> energy (RP) is fitted to bulk system of gold and since crystal gold<br>
> will not have charge transfer or nearly zero charge transfer, the RP<br>
> fitted will be similar to the non-scc case. However, in the case of<br>
> gold clusters, there are in fact non zero charge transfer among<br>
> atoms. And i believe the Rp in this case will be quite different to<br>
> the bulk case since  charge transfer now occurs in the former. In<br>
> these two extreme cases ( bulk gold and gold clusters Au_n, where n<br>
> is less than 10 ), do you think two separate RPs is necessary ?<br>
> Because the Rp in Au-Au.skf is actually fitted to system with nearly<br>
> zero charge transfer, yet in small clusters case, the charge transfer<br>
> can't be neglected. I was speculating maybe  the Rps will be quite<br>
> different in these two cases. Would you provide any comments or<br>
> advice ? Many thanks.<br>
<br>
</span>According to DFTB theory, the repulsive potential is only a functional<br>
of the reference density, which is the superposition of the compressed<br>
neutral atom densities. So the difference, between a system with<br>
considerable charge transfer and a system with almost no charge transfer<br>
must be described by the scc-part of the Hamiltonian, not by the<br>
repulsive, as the reference density is similar in both cases. Therefore,<br>
when done with care, it is usually possible to create repulsive<br>
potentials, which are good compromises for both cases.<br>
<div class="HOEnZb"><div class="h5"><br>
Best regards,<br>
<br>
Bálint<br>
<br>
--<br>
Dr. Bálint Aradi<br>
Bremen Center for Computational Materials Science, University of Bremen<br>
<a href="http://www.bccms.uni-bremen.de/cms/people/b-aradi/" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">http://www.bccms.uni-bremen.<wbr>de/cms/people/b-aradi/</a><br>
<br>
<br>
</div></div><br>______________________________<wbr>_________________<br>
DFTB-Plus-User mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:DFTB-Plus-User@mailman.zfn.uni-bremen.de">DFTB-Plus-User@mailman.zfn.<wbr>uni-bremen.de</a><br>
<a href="https://mailman.zfn.uni-bremen.de/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/dftb-plus-user" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://mailman.zfn.uni-<wbr>bremen.de/cgi-bin/mailman/<wbr>listinfo/dftb-plus-user</a><br></blockquote></div><br><br clear="all"><div><br></div>-- <br><div class="gmail_signature" data-smartmail="gmail_signature"><div dir="ltr"><div>Postdoctoral fellow, Physics department,<br>National Central University, Taiwan(R.O.C)</div></div></div>
</div>